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20121222
20121222
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within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
better able to be used for teaching purposes and then we hope one day we will end up in law school perhaps with an attorney. thank you for everything you've done. the logic, the framework as follows, the first part of the book deals with the war on terrorism demand utility second power which has a debate. homegrown terrorism which is a debate. in the interrogation issue which is a debate for abrams. and been moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant atten
behold him who is my friend and not a stranger. for none of us have wife and hands of a none terms his own master when we die. for if we have life, we are alive in the lord and if we die, we die in the lord. so then, whether we live or die, we are the worse possession. happy from now on are those who died in the lord, so it is said we spirit, for they rest from their labor. >> as dean of washington national cathedral on behalf of the bishop of washington, i will commit to the service celebrating the remarkable life of senator daniel inouye. washington national cathedral serves the nation as a gathering place of time, in times of celebration and sorrow. today's event combines a mixture of both. it is our great privilege to host enjoying so many distinguished women and men gather today to say goodbye to a great leader and public servant. we all come together today from a variety of faith traditions, wherever you are and wherever you find yourself on the journey of faith. we hope that you will fully join in as we listen and sing and pray in thanksgiving and remembrance for this extraordin
some of us here today. if you were age 16 to 25. it can be -- [inaudible] to suggest 28 pounds and give you a train fare. it's not just fantastic -- [inaudible] must be taken by us and promoted by us. instead of us spending another year on the unrealistic campaign. finally, as a whole country, we have an public transport service. of course, there are going to be problems with it. we are human after all. let's stop complaining and focus other campaign -- [inaudible] vital, valuable and realistic this year. a review of the curriculum -- [inaudible] we do not need transport at the campaign. if you are unhappy go and do something about it. make it change locally. so nationally we can bo focus on another more effective campaign. so i plead with you here today to not vote for the u.k. parliament campaign for the next year to be made public transport cheaper, better, and acceptable for all. think. do you want an effective curriculum to prepare us for life? teach us about politics? [inaudible] education and [inaudible] which can be achieved in a year? or do you want to drag out the campaign mak
to buses and trains to allow us to get to school and work? i'd rather be well-informed, well trained, well paid her well-traveled than well, married. and i am not alone. according to the office of national statistics, the number of under 20s getting married represents less than half a percent of all marriages in "the sunday times" in the annual number of marriages is at the lowest for over 100 years. someone once said of the state temporary insanity. without sounding too sappy, love doesn't need a cure. love is about marriage. it is marriage that is immoral without love. perhaps we should be focusing on reducing the uk's high divorce rate rather than promoting marriage. the coalition for equal marriage is love is love regardless of gender. well, i would add that love is love regardless of marital status. and while the majority of us, almost all of us absolutely believe in marriage for all his rate and yes, compared to some countries can bush legalize same-sex marriage some years ago, i note that the u.k. has been slow to act. if things are rapidly changing. the huge success of civil partne
for their use later in the day. that following any leader remarks, the senate begin consideration of h.r. 5949, the fisa bill and senator wyden will be recognized. further, that the previous order be amended so there be up to seven hours of debate on the bill, that's the fisa bill, and all other provisions to that previous order remain in effect. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, we've been able to work things out to i hope everyone's satisfaction. we're not going to have a roll call vote -- we're going to have a roll call vote early in the day on thursday. it will be at 5:30 p.m. on thursday. it will be in relation to the fisa bill or the supplemental appropriations bill. if there's no further business to come before the senate, i ask it adjourn under the previous order. the presiding officer: the senate stands adjourned until 12:00 noon on monday, december 12:00 noon on monday, december >> of the topic that's been on the minds of american parents across this country. and that is what do we do about the tragedies of the sort that struck in newtown, connecticut
was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. wanted to talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s.-mexico war from being with it -- really enthusiastic and in favor to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. there was anti-war sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happen is a consensus across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field to officers, politicians, all the signing that a war that was being more less successfully waged in another country was wrong and actually protesting that war. i think this is an interesting moment in american history cover and it takes place in the world that people don't know much about. people don't write about it a lot. it does not have a big place in the historical imagination of americans, and there are a number of reasons for that. often confused with the te
around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the
photos, and use before it as a metaphor for whatever was happening in the country. that is around the time i called and you were like a good luck, but. i did believe that someone from the area, i could hopefully bring more and sensitivity to the topic suspects and that nuance includes things like humor. so often if someone comes to detroit for a few days, most hired narrative, again, as you know, detroit is a city with fascinating characters and you talk to people and take pictures of empty buildings with nobody in the picture. >> one thing that struck me about the book is not about the buildings but the people. in some cases the people you happened across, not talking heads or public officials, just people you mess. that is one of my favorite stories in the book, the day that you go down to the site of the original trainer, and the pontchartrain hotel on it empty, and one of them was this guy, and wanted to topple about tony, how you met him and why you include him in this book. >> sort of a telling moment, i guess i love that kind of moment and it happens i have been reading a l
of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennessee and think that understanding jeffson in his regional context as well as his national context and his political context is hugely important. he was a master of politics whether it was idealogically driven or geographically driven, and i think there's something resonant about a ferociously-divided atmosphere, big issues at stake and a president who's tall, cool, cerebral, pretty good at politics but doesn't like to admit it having to govern in a frack white house atmosphere. there is something that seems familiar about that. [laughter] so i want to do two quick stories about jefferson to give you two sides of him very quickly. matthew davis, a office seeker from new york, goes to monticello trying to get an appointment. he was, would have fit right in this city even now. travels to lobby for the job. he was a burr l
." he joins us here at the national book festival. if you would like to hear him come out we will be webcasting his event for one of the tents here at the national book festival later this afternoon. you can watch that i booktv.org. the full schedule of live coverage on the web and on c-span2 is available at booktv.org. .. c-span: justice sandra day o'connor, why a book about the lazy b? >> guest: basically, because my brother and i grew up on the lazy b ranch, and it ended up being sold in the late 1980s, and it broke my heart. something that i thought would always be part of me and part of our family and always there for my children and grandchildren and their children was gone, and there wasn't any other way to preserve it, i guess, except to sit down and see if we can write up some of those memories and make it real. c-span: when--when did you start writing it? >> guest: oh, about three years ago. for a long time, it was so painful that the ranch was gone that i couldn't let myself think about it. it would depress me if i did. i don't know if you're like that, but if ther
"hemingway's boat" is the name of the book. thank you for joining us on booktv. .. >> in little america: the war within the war for afghanistan, washington post senior correspondent rajiv command sake ran reports on the military and the government's failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gibbs, editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine, chronicle the relationship of the u.s. presidents in "the presidents club: inside the world's most exclusive fraternity." and kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> in 2008 judge robert bork sat down with eugene meyer, president of the federalist society, on booktv's "after words," an hourlong interview program. judge bork discussed a collection of his written works spanning nearly four decades. this interview was taped at judge bork's home in virginia. judge robert bork
several of us, lot of us gathered at a mosque here near usc, and i heard a sentence that changed my life, and it was this to be religious and the 21st century is to be into religious. it is that the vacation that draws me. so i'm going to apologize only once for being emotional about these things. if i get checked out you can chalk it up to that. one of the great moments in his book is his telling about the genesis moment for this book. >> shore. this is actually ramadan 2010 to august of that year, some walking a batter around 4:00 a.m. and having my last meal before doing my prayers'. it's at that point that i like to, as muslims to, to read more from the corona, additional time of center and indicate to the meditation. instead of people remember what is happening in august of 2010 the crazy discourse unborn. i'm not reading. i'm literally right wing heat website after right when he website trying to anticipate the storyline of the date because every day there are new attacks on the founders of cordoza house. new word about this being a terrorist command center. these are people i've k
. a -- it asserts that several speakers used average amounts of making their calculations, but that significant differences are evident once you analyze different income groups and although this questionnaire would ask this question, we would be interested in hearing from other analysts as well. since those below median income will be treated differently and i am not sure that is quite right, from the average, policy focused only on those in upper income, that is the question that has been raised by senator durbin who allowed he might be willing to consider a change in eligibility if there was some way of predicting low income people. i would be interested in hearing how folks -- how to deal with that. >> a couple responses. the strength of programs like medicare and social security is based on the fact that there are social insurance programs every but pays into and gets out of. i mentioned earlier how the medicaid program itself is very heavily income related and there are different income features throughout the medicare program, certain people have their premiums paid through medicaid. if y
. and we have to figure out how do we survive. these moments of crisis test us. they test our instincts, our loyalties, our faith in ourselves, our creativity. they test our emotions, and they certainly test our courage. on may 16, 1874, a reservoir dam gave way in western montana. it unleashed an inland tidal wave that was at times 20-40 feet high and 300 feet wide. it roared down a 14-mile valley and swept through the villages of williamsburg, skinnerville, haydenville and the town of north hatchton. to give you a sense of the power of that water is to appreciate the amount of time it took to pass through portions of the valley. in the lower portion of the valley, the land levels out into an aleve y'all plain, and the town took about an hour and a half to flood into the town and into the connecticut river. in the upper regions of the valley where the land is sweeper, that water went through the villages in about 15 minutes each. it resulted in the worst industrial disaster in american history at the time. over a million dollars worth of property damage was sustained, almost 800 people
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15